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Judith B. Shields’ Interview with Indie-Loop

Judith B. Shields

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Judith B. Shields’ Interview with Indie-Loop

A closer look at microbudget filmmaking.

IL: You are one of the special guest panelists at this year’s Comicpalooza (2013) discussing how to make an independent film on a budget. Great topic since many indie-artists/film makers struggle with the financial aspect in launching their projects. What advice can you give indie-artists dealing with this dilemma?”

To read Shields’ answer, please read the rest of this great interview at

http://www.indie-loop.com/q5-judithb-shields/

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Congratulations to Matt Risoldi for his nomination for C-47 Best Actor 2013!

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Congratulations to Matt Risoldi for his nomination for C-47 Best Actor 2013!

Matt Risoldi tackled the role of the monster. His interpretation of Mary Shelley’s character brings the monster “to life” by connecting with the audience. He provides a compassionate character who later falls from innocence.

From “Land of the Nerds”:   http://landofnerds.com/2013/12/28/steampunkfrankensteinsmonster/

<<What I really liked about the film was how actor Matt Risoldi portrayed the Monster. Instead of Electrodes, he had a steam apparatus attached to his neck, releasing steam in bursts as he talked and moved. Risoldi towers over the rest of the cast. He emotes well, and is quite believable as the Monster. The Monster is sympathetic, even to his creator for a moment. He screams, he rants, he rails, it is the Monster, not the Mad Scientist, who admits that he “IS ALIVE!!!!”>>

I couldn’t have written that better.I will also make note of Matt Risoldi’s co-star, Dustin Sturgill and supporting cast member, Tim Ashby. Sturgill was an anchor for the entire film. His excellent line memorization provided stability especially since his lines consisted of nearly half of the script. Sturgill’s Frankenstein was perfectly selfish and obsessed. Tim Ashby played Clerval, Frankenstein’s best friend and provided light comedic relief as well as  sympathy for everyone influenced by Frankenstein’s decisions.The entire cast worked well together and were top notch professionals. It is not easy to accomplish a microbudget film in 14 days with little time for practice.

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Frankenstein's Monster (2013) Official Page

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Congratulations to Matt Risoldi for his nomination for C-47 Best Actor 2013!

Matt Risoldi tackled the role of the monster. His interpretation of Mary Shelley’s character brings the monster “to life” by connecting with the audience. He provides a compassionate character who later falls from innocence.

From “Land of the Nerds”:   http://landofnerds.com/2013/12/28/steampunkfrankensteinsmonster/

<<What I really liked about the film was how actor Matt Risoldi portrayed the Monster. Instead of Electrodes, he had a steam apparatus attached to his neck, releasing steam in bursts as he talked and moved. Risoldi towers over the rest of the cast. He emotes well, and is quite believable as the Monster. The Monster is sympathetic, even to his creator for a moment. He screams, he rants, he rails, it is the Monster, not the Mad Scientist, who admits that he “IS ALIVE!!!!”>>

I couldn’t have written that better.I will also make note of Matt…

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Film Techniques–Land of the Nerds

Thank you Land of the Nerds for this cast/crew interview.

“Christopher recommends that to build props for a low-budget film you need to find someone who can take a look at random bits of things found in a hardware store. Just a little imagination and a few bits of scrap can go a long way to building some amazing props.

As an actor, the most difficult scene for Matt was sitting under the sheets, waiting to film the reanimation sequence. “I didn’t want it to look like a cartoon.” He had not seen a lot of Frankenstein films, other than Young Frankenstein, which was a different style from this film. He had no preconceived notions of how to be the monster, to act like other versions. The apparatus that made the steam was not uncomfortable; it attached down a tube to a flask of dry ice.

What we learned from this interview and panel was that props for films can be made cheaply and effectively if you know where to look and who to ask. You don’t need a super fancy video camera, a really nice camera with video capacity can do wonders, and microphones can be made inexpensively.

We also learned that the cast of Frankenstein’s Monster is passionate about the project, and that passion can be seen in the film. I urge anyone who gets the chance to watch this film to do so.”

 

To read their entire article:

http://landofnerds.com/2014/01/10/frankensteins-monster-space-city-con/

Filmmaking Panel at Space City Con (Galveston, Texas)

 

Quote from article:

“For the filming, some of the most important aspects to the filmmakers were to ensure that the film maintained an authentic, Victorian period-style. To maintain that look, the filmmakers needed to ensure that the costumes were beautiful and accurate. Costumes can be an expensive, especially period costumes. Luckily, the producer, Judith Shields, found J’Nean Henderson, Victorian Lady.”

To read the rest of the article, please go to their great page:

http://landofnerds.com/2014/01/10/frankensteins-monster-space-city-con/